How is ductal carcinoma different from in situ?

Is ductal carcinoma in situ really cancer?

Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) means the cells that line the milk ducts of the breast have become cancer, but they have not spread into surrounding breast tissue. DCIS is considered non-invasive or pre-invasive breast cancer.

What is the difference between ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive carcinoma of the breast?

In situ vs.

In situ breast cancer (ductal carcinoma in situ or DCIS) is a cancer that starts in a milk duct and has not grown into the rest of the breast tissue. The term invasive (or infiltrating) breast cancer is used to describe any type of breast cancer that has spread (invaded) into the surrounding breast tissue.

What differentiates carcinoma from carcinoma in situ?

Carcinoma in situ, also called in situ cancer, is different from invasive carcinoma, which has spread to surrounding tissue, and from metastatic carcinoma, which has spread throughout the body to other tissues and organs. In general, carcinoma in situ is the earliest form of cancer, and is considered stage 0.

How fast does ductal carcinoma in situ grow?

It assumes that all breast carcinomas begin as DCIS and take 9 years to go from a single cell to an invasive lesion for the slowest growing lesions, 6 years for intermediate growing DCIS lesions, and 3 years for fast-growing DCIS lesions.

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How serious is ductal carcinoma?

DCIS isn’t life-threatening, but having DCIS can increase the risk of developing an invasive breast cancer later on. When you have had DCIS, you are at higher risk for the cancer coming back or for developing a new breast cancer than a person who has never had breast cancer before.

How is carcinoma in situ treated?

Treatment of DCIS has a high likelihood of success, in most instances removing the tumor and preventing any recurrence. In most people, treatment options for DCIS include: Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) and radiation therapy. Breast-removing surgery (mastectomy)

Should I have a mastectomy for DCIS?

If the DCIS is large, a mastectomy may be recommended. Removing the opposite breast usually isn’t recommended; chemotherapy usually isn’t recommended either. Hormonal therapy may be recommended if the DCIS is hormone-receptor-positive. DCIS is NOT invasive cancer.

What are the symptoms of ductal carcinoma?

What are the symptoms of invasive ductal carcinoma?

  • Lump in the breast.
  • Thickening of the breast skin.
  • Rash or redness of the breast.
  • Swelling in one breast.
  • New pain in one particular location of a breast.
  • Dimpling around the nipple or on the breast skin.
  • Nipple pain or the nipple turning inward.
  • Nipple discharge.

Why did I get DCIS?

DCIS forms when genetic mutations occur in the DNA of breast duct cells. The genetic mutations cause the cells to appear abnormal, but the cells don’t yet have the ability to break out of the breast duct. Researchers don’t know exactly what triggers the abnormal cell growth that leads to DCIS.

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