What is linked to colon cancer?

What cancers are associated with colon cancer?

People who have had colon cancer can get any type of second cancer, but they have an increased risk of:

  • A second colon cancer (This is different from the first cancer coming back.)
  • Rectal cancer.
  • Oral cavity and oropharynx.
  • Stomach cancer.
  • Small intestine cancer.
  • Anal cancer.
  • Bile duct cancer.
  • Uterine cancer.

What is the number one cause of colon cancer?

According to the American Cancer Society (ACS), 55 percent of colorectal cancer diagnoses in the United States are attributed to controllable lifestyle factors. These include: Diet—The risk is higher for those who eat a high-fat diet, a lot of processed meat or red meat.

Who is more susceptible to colon cancer?

The risk of colorectal cancer increases as people get older. Colorectal cancer can occur in young adults and teenagers, but the majority of colorectal cancers occur in people older than 50. For colon cancer, the average age at the time of diagnosis for men is 68 and for women is 72.

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How does colon cancer arise?

Colorectal cancer arises when cells in the mucous lining of the intestine change (mutate) and then multiply out of control. This growth pushes the cells into surrounding tissue. There are a number of possible causes of these kinds of changes, including pollution or radiation. But they often simply occur by chance.

What was your first colon cancer symptom?

A persistent change in your bowel habits, including diarrhea or constipation or a change in the consistency of your stool. Rectal bleeding or blood in your stool. Persistent abdominal discomfort, such as cramps, gas or pain. A feeling that your bowel doesn’t empty completely.

Can you live a long life with colon cancer?

The majority of patients diagnosed with colon cancer can be treated and will go on to live normal lives. The earlier we identify the lesion, the less likely the tumor will have spread to other parts of your body.

How can colon cancer be detected without a colonoscopy?

Beyond colonoscopy, screening methods for colorectal cancer include:

  1. Fecal immunochemical testing. Fecal immunochemical testing (FIT) involves analyzing stool samples. …
  2. Fecal occult blood testing. …
  3. Stool DNA. …
  4. Sigmoidoscopy. …
  5. CT colonography. …
  6. Double-contrast barium enema. …
  7. A single-specimen gFOBT.

How long does it take for colon cancer to get to stage 4?

Colon cancer, or cancer that begins in the lower part of the digestive tract, usually forms from a collection of benign (noncancerous) cells called an adenomatous polyp. Most of these polyps will not become malignant (cancerous), but some can slowly turn into cancer over the course of about 10-15 years.

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What race is most affected by colon cancer?

Colorectal cancer also disproportionately affects the Black community, where the rates are the highest of any racial/ethnic group in the US. African Americans are about 20% more likely to get colorectal cancer and about 40% more likely to die from it than most other groups.

What are the chances of getting colon cancer if your mother had it?

A family history of colorectal cancer or adenomatous polyps

Still, as many as 1 in 3 people who develop colorectal cancer have other family members who have had it. People with a history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative (parent, sibling, or child) are at increased risk.