Your question: What is the best treatment for stage 2 melanoma?

What treatment is used for stage 2 melanoma?

The standard treatment for Stage II melanoma is surgery, called wide local excision. The purpose of the surgery is to remove any cancer remaining after the biopsy.

What happens if you have stage 2 melanoma?

Stage 2 melanoma means the tumor is more than 1 mm thick and may be larger or have grown deeper into the skin. It may be ulcerated or not ulcerated. The cancer has not spread to nearby lymph nodes or to distant parts of the body. Surgery to remove the cancerous tumor is the usual treatment strategy.

How long does it take for melanoma to spread to lymph nodes?

How fast does melanoma spread and grow to local lymph nodes and other organs? “Melanoma can grow extremely quickly and can become life-threatening in as little as six weeks,” noted Dr. Duncanson.

What does Stage 2 melanoma look like?

Stage 2A means one of the following: the melanoma is between 1 and 2 mm thick and the outermost layer of skin covering the tumour looks broken under the microscope (it is ulcerated) the melanoma is between 2 and 4 mm thick and is not ulcerated.

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Can melanoma be completely cured?

Treatment can completely cure melanoma in many cases, especially when it has not spread extensively. However, melanoma can also recur. It is natural to have questions about the treatment, its side effects, and the chances of cancer recurring.

Can you live a long life with melanoma?

almost all people (almost 100%) will survive their melanoma for 1 year or more after they are diagnosed. around 90 out of every 100 people (around 90%) will survive their melanoma for 5 years or more after diagnosis.

How long does it take melanoma to spread?

Melanoma can grow very quickly. It can become life-threatening in as little as 6 weeks and, if untreated, it can spread to other parts of the body. Melanoma can appear on skin not normally exposed to the sun. Nodular melanoma is a highly dangerous form of melanoma that looks different from common melanomas.

Where does melanoma usually spread to first?

Normally, the first place a melanoma tumor metastasizes to is the lymph nodes, by literally draining melanoma cells into the lymphatic fluid, which carries the melanoma cells through the lymphatic channels to the nearest lymph node basin.

Can you have melanoma for years and not know?

How long can you have melanoma and not know it? It depends on the type of melanoma. For example, nodular melanoma grows rapidly over a matter of weeks, while a radial melanoma can slowly spread over the span of a decade. Like a cavity, a melanoma may grow for years before producing any significant symptoms.

How does melanoma make you feel?

Hard lumps may appear in your skin. You may lose your breath, have chest pain or noisy breathing or have a cough that won’t go away. You may feel pain in your liver (the right side of your stomach) Your bones may feel achy.

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How can you tell if melanoma has spread to lymph nodes?

The most common symptom if cancer has spread to the lymph nodes is that they feel hard or swollen. Swollen lymph nodes in the neck area can make it hard to swallow. Cancer cells can also stop lymph fluid from draining away. This might lead to swelling in the neck or face due to fluid buildup in that area.

What happens if melanoma has spread to lymph nodes?

If the melanoma has spread into the lymph nodes, it means cancer has spread beyond its original site (the primary tumor). It will need a more aggressive line of management. Melanoma is a rapidly progressive type of skin cancer. The treatment of melanoma depends on the stage of the disease.

How do you know if melanoma has spread?

If your melanoma has spread to other areas, you may have:

  • Hardened lumps under your skin.
  • Swollen or painful lymph nodes.
  • Trouble breathing, or a cough that doesn’t go away.
  • Swelling of your liver (under your lower right ribs) or loss of appetite.
  • Bone pain or, less often, broken bones.